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>> "inside washington" is brought you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> we are going to die. we are going to freeze. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wi
>> "inside washington" is brought to you in part by the federal association of employees, proud to make the gornment work. >> production assistants for "inside washington" provided by albritton communications and "politico." >> we have to pick ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nion,ut then the networks called ohio a
to washington today after winning the electoral college, the popular vote and a second term. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, kwame holman wraps up the results and the reaction and ray suarez reports from chicago on the president's day. >> woodruff: we assess the tactics that led to success for the obama campaign and failure for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and
from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was fres
about the choices ahead. from washington d.c., tom friedman. he's a columnist for the "new york times" and coauthor of that used to be us, how america fell beyond the world we invented and how we can come back. david bureaucrats the author of social love and achievement. joining me is tom brokaw, special correspondent for nbc news and author of the times of our lives, a conversation about america. and jon meacham executive editor of random house and author of the fourth coming book, thomas jefferson e art of power. finally amy gutmann president of the university of pennsylvania and chair of the bioethics and quo author of the spirit of promise why campaigning under mines it. i am pleased to have each here for this information. what is it that this new president has to understand about america at this moment? >> well, i think that this new president is going to have to govern, and governing in a polarized society which we have and a society whic has tremendous problem, budgetary economic, immigration, educational. the list goes on. governing is going to mean bipartisan deals. and so ma
assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> i have no evidence at this point, from what i've seen, the classified information was disclosed. >> this week on "inside washington," a sex scandal at the top of the cia. the benghazi blame game. >> the american people deserve to know the facts. we cannot ever let this happen again. >> why would susan rice not get our vote? i don't trust her. >> defending susan rice. >> senator mccain and senator graham want to go after some big, they should go after me. >> there are no barriers, they to sitting down and working through this process. >> as the fiscal cliff limbs, is there a deal in the works? mitt romney explains why he lost . >> the president's campaign was focused on his base coalition, giving extraordinary gifts from the government, working aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> i just don't know where to begin this week. do we talk about republican charges of
in washington and on wall street. you can read how they did it in this book "winner-take-all politics" by two of the country's top political scientists, jacob hacker and paul pierson. they were drawn to a mystery every bit as puzzling as a crime drama "how washington made the richricher and turned its back on the middle class." quote -- "we wanted to know how our economy stopped working to provide prosperity and security for the broad middle class." and that's what you saw. >> i think a lot of people know. the top one or two wrongs have shot up into the stratosphere while all of the other ones have stayed more or lessn place. it's really astonishing how concentrated the games of economic growth have been. >> you know the startling statistic that we have in the book is that if you take all of the income gains from 1979 to 2007, so all the increased household income over that period around 40% of those gains went to the top 1%. and if you look at the bottom 90%, they had less than that combined. and it's not just a one or a two-year story. i mean, we've seen a terrible economy over the last few
go to washington and albert hunt. where are we? >> charlie, i think that the fat lady is started to sing. it looks like things are moving in a very, very slow but steady direction in barack obama's favor both in the popular vote and the electoral vote. i base that on the plls, to be sure. also talking to both sides today i think's clearly more confidence in the obama camp. i think this is one of those great elections. there are very few of them, 2004 and 2000 were two where you aren't certain who is going to win but certainly all signs are pointing to a small obama victory tomorrow. >> rose: john harris? >> i agree with that if you look at these numbers and you look at the electoral college landscape and through any conventional prism what al said is completely true. the only caution i would make is this has n be a year in which the conventional prism has been especially reliable so it's a little late to start applying a conventional analysis now. >> rose: (laughs) cokie roberts? >> you know, what obama is concerned about is exactly this conversation as he said today "i have enou
outward fro the pentagon today, and across official washington. the name of u.s. marine general john allen, the top american commander in afghanistan, surfaced overnight in the scandal that began friday with david petraeus resigning at c.i.a. director. unnamed defense officials say the military is now investigating possibly, quote, inappropriate communications between allen and tampa socialite jill kelley. she had reported getting harassing emails from another woman, paula broadwell. the f.b.i. investigation that followed uncovered broadwell's affair with petraeus. but according to the newest revelations, agents also found extensive contacts between kelley and general allen. the f.b.i. notifieded the pentagon on sunday. last night spokesman george little read a statement from defense secretary leon panetta on a flight to australia. >> today the secretary directed that the matter be referred to the inspector general of the department of defense for investigation. it is now in the hands of the department of the secretary-general. >> brown: early news accounts said allen andkelley exchanged 2
washington d.c., davidic nake a column else for "the washington post" and martha raddatz a senior affairs correspondent with abc news. two cbs colleagues, norah o'donnell my cohost and john miller correspondent at cbs news wh is frequently with me on cbs this morning. i'm please to do have all of them here. we'll be joined by norah and john in just a moment. martha tell me about general petraeus. do you know him. what is it about this story that surprises you most? >> well, i have known general petraeus and covered him in war zones for about a decade and what surprised me most is he seems like a man who is so disciplined and so careful about his image andbout his retation that it was jaw dropping to me when i first heard it. >> rose: so the question is what didn't you understand about him? >> well, i mean i may not understand everything about him now but i was surprised that he would allow this i guess failure of discipline. he really does guard his reputation so well. he watch the people who are around him. but he granted paula broadwell this unprecedent the act sessments we've had acc
of votes that might get them-- many my favorite washington verb-- primaried. when you talk to these guys, when the cameras are away, they say the real problem here is not so much the general election it's that if we vote vote with the other side on a couple of big things which is what a fiscal deal is going to require then we're going to get hit by people who think we aren't pure enough so we are punishing compromise at just the moment we need. the middle way is not always the right way, but sometimes it is. >> we are punishing compromise, but we also need leaders in congress who will be courageous enough, have the debts as well as the -- the depth as well as the stamina to really make a difference. what we didn't say is that the president's going to have to do right after the election is is he's going to have to staredown congress and especially his own party. you cater to your own party when you campaign you've got to make your own party a little unhappy if you're going to govern -- >> rose: so back to teddy roosevelt. had we lost the presidency as the bully pulpit and are we looking a
to approve same-sex marriage passed by referendum in maine, maryland and washington state. and voters in minnesota rejected a proposed constitutional ban on gay marriage. in massachusetts, a measure to legalize physician-assisted suicide was narrowly defeated. in california, voters decided not to abolish the death penalty. with all the acrimony around the election, many religious leaders called for a new spirit of civility. more than 700 churches held special election day communion services. organizers said they wanted to refocus allegiance to god and work for justice beyond the ballot box. our assessment of the election returns in a few moments. >>> faith-based groups continue to mobilize to help those affected by hurricane sandy. on the east coast, volunteers across the spectrum are serving food, providing shelter and helping with cleanup in a massive relief operation. this week, ny othose forts we hampereby evn mo bad weather. kim lawton has more on the efforts in one new york community. >> a week after sandy, rabbi shneur wolowik of the chabad lubavitch movement is in the devastat
: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. >> reporter: to republican leaders balance means some higher tax revenues are paired with reductions in spending and changes in entitlement programs. that's a challenge for democrats, but the president seemed willing to move in that direction. >> our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises, build some consensus to do the peoples business. and what folks are looking for-- and i think all of us
are one way to help washington get its fiscal house in order, c.e.o. bill polacek says it would take a massive, preventable and personal toll here in johnstown. >> everything i've worked for, everything everybody worked for, in 25 years of business that we're celebrating this year, could all be for naught, only because the people in congress, and the senate, can't vote to do what's in the best interest of the american people. >> reporter: congress has until january first to avert the sequester. until then, manufacturers, researchers, teachers and a host of others will be waiting to find out if and how the fiscal cliff will affect them. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: we've seen the estimates on going over the cliff, recession, some even calling it debt-mageddon. but from tax rates, to entitlement spending, what are the real policy implications here? to answer that question, our washington bureau chief darren gersh recently spoke with economists from both sides of the aisle. dean baker and douglas holtz- eakin joined us and after a coin toss, darren started with dean asking
's measured in achievement. >> warner: in fairfax an independent voter rich suburb of washington d.c. >> so many of you look at the big debates in this country not as a republican or a democrat but as an independent thinker, as an american. and you watch what's happened to this country over the last four years with an independent voice you hope that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together. to solve big problems. he hasn't. i will. ( cheers and applause ) >> warner: in late afternoon he rallieded supporters in columbus, the capital of all important ohio. >> we feel good about the nature of the race. i think we're going to win ohio >> warner: do you see a path to victory without winning ohio >> there are numerous paths to victory to get to 270. but like anyone else, we'd rather get there with ohio than without it >> warner: ohio so crucial that romney's running mate paul ryan was there today to too. on the heels of stops in nevada, colorado, and iowa. romney's day won't end until midnight after an election eve rally in manchester, new hampshire. >> woodruff: late
the president may become more flexible. here in pakistan relations with washington are expected to remain tense. the two sides differ over how to handle elements of al qaeda and other militants hiding in remote areas of pakistan near the afghanistan border. the obama administration has said they're not doing enough to comfort terrorists operationing on pakistani soil. the u.s. have stepped up terror attacks using unmanned drownes. the attacks have aggravated anti-american sentiments. if president obama want this to succeed he must see it in pakistan. >>> all japanese and many people abroad are familiar with oragami. the craft has spread around the world. teachers in israel are using oragami but not to make betiful fires. >> reporter: math teachers began using oragami about ten years ago. students are making geometry shapes. >> translator: when it comes to solving problems i find that oragami makes it easier. >> reporter: the teacher brought the craft to schools. when she was a child she watched a tv show about oragami. then she started making her own. 20 years ago she visited japan. it fascinat
. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going off the "fiscal cliff" resumed in earnest today. the president moved to draw on his reelection victory for new clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping deficit agreement to avert $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about them. the question of whether or not taxes go up on 98% of american tax payers is a very important to ordinary americans. it is not just a matter for discussion between the president and the senate minority leader. or other congressional leaders. >> brown: to that end the president met privately today with small business owners. on friday he'll travel to the philadelphia area to speak further on the issue. not to be outdone, house republicans said they'll meet with s
... >> narrator: obama arrived in chicago after the election of the city's first black mayor, harold washington. >> ...have joined hands to form a new democratic coalition... (applause and cheers) >> i think that the fact that chicago had elected an african-american mayor in harold washington sort of emphasized with barack that he was coming to a city where blacks were a major presence and had some significance. >> narrator: washington's politics were a living example of what obama was looking for. >> what washington was able to do was to put together these coalitions-- african-americans, latinos and progressive whites. and he was able to pull that together and beat the machine. >> god bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart. >> and that kind of coalition building was incredibly influential for barack. >> narrator: obama's laboratory would be the city's south side. >> we had put an ad in a number of newspapers for a community organizer in the south side of chicago. i'm okinfor anybody who might be a good organizer, but i particularly need somebody who's african-american. >> and
economy has nothing to do with washington. what the president and what washington in general can do is try to set the stage and set a groundwork for policy at could encourage growth. and i think the shorter term that you are thinking about, the less can be done specifically by the president. so if you are asking over a one month or three month period, there's very little the president can do. if you start asking over a five year, ten year period, then the policy decisions they make can influence quite a lot the way things go. >> brown: and john taylor, brief last word on that? >> well, i think as we are talking about four years what is going to happen the next four years. that say time where a president can make a tremendo dference. and we're talking about the past four years. and the president could have made a much better policy with the unemployment being so high. >> brown: all right, john taylor and austan goolsbee, thanks so much. >> thank you >> brown: and if you're ready for more analysis on the jobs numbers, you'll find it, as always, on paul solman's "making sense" page online. >>
house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they-- those kids will do better in school. >> woodruff: and from politics here to the power shift in china.
&p was up a fraction. american businesses are not only concerned about the fiscal showdown in washington, but also about corporate earnings. nearly all of the s&p 500 firms have reported numbers, and profit growth is the slowest since the recession in 2009. and the majority of firms are also reporting disappointing revenues. here's erika miller with a look back at the quarter, and a look ahead. >> reporter: earnings season is drawing to a close. and for many firms it's good riddance. nearly all of the s&p 500 have reported quarterly numbers, and according to s&p capital i.q., profits are up a measly 2%. thomson reuters and factset crunch the numbers slightly differently, and believe profits are actually down. the bigger concern is revenue growth. s&p has the most optimistic analysis with a 0.6% gain. the other two firms see negative growth. firms face an almost universal problem: a slowing global economy. >> companies kind of put it in this context: the red flag is europe still. china falling there after, being kind of a yellow flag. >> reporter: that weak global demand is forcing many c
of the blue thunder bolt that hit washington friday. >> brown: all weekend in washington the details kept coming along with more questions. after david petraeus' sudden resignation on friday because he had had an extra marital affair quickly revealed to involve his biographer paula broadwell. her book came out last january. appearing on c-span she recalled first meeting petraeus several years earlier. >> he came to harvard university where i was a graduate student and wanted to speak to students about the merits of counterinsurgency approach to fighting the iraq war. >> brown: later researching her book broadwell had extensive access to petraeus during his time as overall commander in afghanistan. in august of last year, wife holy at his side the four-star general retired from the service. he took the c.i.a. post the next month. today the general's former spokesman retired colonel steve boylan told abc the affair began then, after he had left the army which strictly for bids adultery. >> this all started about two months after he was in the c.i.a. as the director and just so you know it a
with republican leaders get underway to avoid the fiscal cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders, the president took a tougher tone on budget talks. in his news conference, he pushed hard for an immediate extension of tax cuts for everyone making less than $250,000 a year. >> and by the way, that means every american, inuding the wealthiest americans get a tax cut. it means that 98% of all americans, and 97% of all small businesses won't see their taxes go up a single dime. the senate has already passed a law like this. democrats in the house are ready to pass a law like this and i hope republicans in the house come on board too. >> reporter: republicans said again they would be willing to raise more tax revenue by closing loopholes or limiting deductions. but those revenues had to be matched with cuts in entitlement programs. >> until u ma our entitlement programs fit the future demographic of country, the demograp
in washington are making progress. that led to a powerful rally today, continuing the momentum from friday after that white house meetingetweenredent obama, and congressional leaders. stocks rallied right from the opening bell: the dow surged 207 points, the nasdaq jumped nearly 63, and the s&p 500 rose 27. >> tom: those hopes about a fiscal cliff deal may be good enough for stock traders today, but is the economy in a position to deal with whatever solution politicians may hammer out? it's expected that the fiscal fix will involve tax hikes of some sort, and spending cuts as well. we spoke with economist dean baker from the center for economic and policy research, and economist douglas holtz- eakin of the american action forum. "n.b.r.'s" washington bureau chief darren gersh began the discussion by asking baker what tighter federal policy will mean for the economy in the coming year. >> insofar as we get austerity, we get tax increases, spending cuts, that's going to slow the economy. i anticipate a deal so we are don't see the full, you know, $500 billion tax increases 100 billion spending cut
and washington may have refused to arm these rebels. but armed they are like never before. >> suarez: and margaret warner takes the story from there. >> warner: for more on today's developments and what they mean for syria's president bashar al assad, i'm joined by andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. he was in rebel-held syrian border regions in mid-november. andrew, welcome back. >> thank you. >> warner: first of all, how critical is the rebel seizure of some of these surface-to-air missile from the captured army bases? >> they're answer cloutly vital. for months the syrian army has harassed rebel held territories and they've bombed them into submission. with these shoulder-fired missiles they're able to down syrian aircraft of all types and it allows the syrian opposition to have the possibility of actually saying they have a pure liberated territory which is completely outside of the regime's contr a that sets the stage for a possible benghazi-like pocket that could push president assad south and west war war so step back from all today
turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that's unique and really well written and complex, i feel it's worthy to do. and then i herd that denzel was interested i doing it, and when iwhen i read the screen play it was like he was perfect for the part. so i called him up and said, are you really interested in this?" and he said, "year, i am." >> number one is the screen play. as they say, if it's not on the page it's not on the stage. as bob said, when you get a hold of something, when you read something that just grabs you-- and it's very rare that that happens for me, anyway, where you just it's a page turner and it's complex and it's interesting and it's something i hadn't done before. it's an easy decision. >> rose:e concdehis evening with the former chair of the f.d.i.c., sheila bair. >> my view is that, look, we had a crisis in 2008. but in 2009, we had a stable system. that was when we sho
fund, with a grant from the orfalea foundation. >> it's time to send a message to washington: stop spending money we don't have. how can we afford this tax? ...big corporations and the richest two percent. >> what's at stake is the future of america. >> it costs us, and taxes us, too much. >> american future fund is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> ryssdal: i knew right away this wasn't going to be the usual story on campaign finance. one of the first surprises was finding myself driving the dark streets of denver with attorney alan schwartz, who shared kind of a strange experience. >> it was early january of 2011, and my wife, who had just been reelected to the colorado state senate, goan e-mail from someone who claimed to have some information about a group that had sent out some attack ads against my wife. >> ryssdal: the guy said he had some documents, and a week later... >> i heard from this individual again. still not identifying himself, but telling me that if i wanted to see the documents, then i needed to get them that day. >> ryssdal: had to be that day
melham, washington bureau chief for al- arabiya; and dan schueftan is director of national security studies center at the university of haifa. gentlemen, one thing i think a lot of people, myself included are wondering how did this flare-up seemingly so quickly. dan schueftan. >> well, since hamas took over we had for a while a thoand rockets per year, then came israeli escalation and-- and it went down to a small number of rockets every year, last year again we came to about a thousand rockets against israel. and this intensified in recent weeks to the point where israel had to take action. israel was saying for about two weeks, i mean people here were dealing with the elections and other things. but it was saying it must lead to a point where either it stops or we will have to take action. when it didn't stop israel took action. >> brown: what do you think happened to build telephone up? >> we have never seen quiet on the border even from 2008 until now. and a few days leading to the israeli decision to take on, assassinate a major military leader of hamas there were skirmishes an
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans who'd be hit by any tax increase. >> i'm glad to see-- if you've been reading the papers lately-- - that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with thiidea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> brown: one such lawmaker is
to change for the better tomorrow. >> the latest poll from abc news and the washington post suggests 50% of likely voters will cast their ballots for obama. 47% for romney. polls indicate a close race in eight states. some suggest the candidates are running even. others give obama a narrow lead. >> the economy is what i think is numbe one. >> health care. >> new jobs. >> investors around the world are also closely following the u.s. election. >> a lot of focus on the u.s. election here in japan but investors are looking at the earnings reports coming out of japanese companies this week. let's start by taking a look at stocks here in tokyo. they are trading lower on tuesday morning as investors hold pack from active trading ahead of the presidential election. the nikkei is at 8,970 that's down about 37 points from monday's close. as i said many investors are keeping an eye on upcoming corporate earnings reports for the half year through september. shares of panasonic and sharp are trading lower again. take a look at tokyo for an exchange. trading is limited ahead of tuesday's u.s. presid
. a trial in that case is scheduled to begin in february. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: joining us now, mitchell crusto. he's a law professor at loyola university in new orleans, and has been studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notove. the government is bringing gross negligence charges against bp. bp is going to fight it vigorously how is that going to play out? >> it's difficult for them toave standard when they admitted to the felony charges. when it's related to the environment. it's some $20 billion this is a big story but it's an even bigger story ahead. >> there have been so many fines there a silver lining to all of this? does this make t
.s. and tens of thousands of people are without electricity in oregon and washington on monday and rainfall of reported in some locations leading to serious flooding and unfortunately hefty showers will continue from northern california up into washington into your wednesday. that could raise the risk of flooding even more. meanwhile, as for the inland locations, heavy snow showers are pounding and mainly in western montana and light conditions occurring here and conditions will be spreading into idaho on wednesday. gusts could exceed more than 60 kilometers per hour and an additional 50 centimeters of snow is likely. lots of things are going on and it is going to be on going story into your wednesday and on thursday on the u.s. thanksgiving day, sunny skies should return to seattle with a high of ten degrees and as for oklahoma city, warm and sunny day on wednesday but light showers possible on thursday and new york cy will continue to see sunny skies into your thursday. all right. moving into east asia then, snow showers are still on going in the northern half of japan, particularly ho di
.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retailing added 36,000 jobs. health care 31,000 jobs. construction 17,000 jobs. manufacturing shook off its recent losses, adding 13,000 jobs. the unemployment rate did tick up to 7.9%. but even that may be a sign of strength. labor force participation had been falling as older workers retired and others gave up looking for work. over the last two months that trend has reversed and labor force participation is at its highest level in three years. >> that's a very good sign because it means job opportunities are increasing. it's drawing people in. >> reporter: wage growth wa
will continue in this election cycle. melissa deckman is professor of political science at washington college in chestertown, maryland. >> if you think about the god gap, so-called "god gap," it's still alive and well this year in american politics, and it's gger than things likehe gender gap, although you often hear more in the media about women's voting and men's voting, so i think religion continues to play a big role in american presidential elections. >> the republicans are hoping for a big turnout from evangelicals, who make up about one quarter of gop voters. in the early days of the campaign, there were questions about whether theological differences would keep evangelicals from supporting a mormon candidate. governor mitt romney's campaign tried to woo them on the basis of shared values. >> people of different faiths, like yours and mine, sometis wonder where we c meet in common purpose, when there are so many differences in creed and theology. surely the answer is that we can meet in service, in shared moral convictions about our nation stemming from a common worldview. >> it seems
matters what the whole complexion of washington looks like t really comes down in many cases to who wins in the senate. do we have a gop sweep with a romney win or do you still have a democratic senate that can really change the complexion of what this lame duck lex looks like and what the status quo election may lend itself to a quick res luig of a lame duck session so a lot depends not just on the without wins the oval office but its next two years in congress looks like. >> susie: so talk us through that. let's say president o ba am a wins the election but you have republicans dominating in congress. what does that mean for the stock market. and vice versa, if romney becomes president romney and he has a democratic congress, if he has to grapple with. >> i will service its second one first, if romney has to deal with a democratic congress, really a democratic senate the house probably stays in the hands of republicans. unlikely to craft a deal in a very short amount of timement remember we've got this fiscal cliff hitting next year and a lame duck session with a lot of that needs to b
out a bigger plan for a grand bargain. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: while investors remain focused on the fiscal cliff, a further jump in consumer sentiment helped stocks close in the green today. the university of michigan reuters consumer sentiment index this month se t84.9. that's its highest level since july of 2007. the dow added four points, the nasdaq was up nine, the s&p 500 added two points. for the week overall, the dow fell 2.1%. the nasdaq dropped 2.6%. and the s&p 500 is 2.4% lower tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to see much compromise until mid to late january. if we don't get things in order by february that's when things can start to get ugly for the markets. >> reporter: with so much short- term risks, greco says retail in
. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, dvid ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york
opportunities. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: talk of the fiscal cliff threat didn't seem to hurt cyber monday, the biggest online shopping day of the year. americans are expected to spend $1.5 billion online today according to research firm comscore. that's up 20% from last year, as retailers pull out all the stops to get shoppers to click on their websites. erika miller has more. >> reporter: many americans were hard at work today. but others were hardly working-- using high speed office computers to scour the internet for bargains. others browsed at retail stores, but used mobile phones and tablets to make their purchases online. >> but internet shopping is more than just price comparison this year. it's about going shopping with friends and family even when they're not there. >> it makes them feel better about shopping when they are accessing social media. and its sort of that gratifying that other people agree that this the kind of product that someone would like. it's a quality product. it performs well whatever. >> reporter: a whopping 122 million americans are expected to
. that's our proposal, period. >> reporter: no one in washington ever thought negotiations to get past the fiscal cliff would be easy. now, more and more are talking about a rerun of what happened with the tarp bailout bill. first, congress may have to deadlock and go over the cliff, and then count on a falling market and an angry public to force action. >> it's what's euphemistically bng called "let's let the peasants storm the castle with pitchforks" strategy. that is, get the average voter so upset that they pound on the... do the equivalent of pound on the door of their member of congress or the member of the senate, call their office and say, "look, i know i told you not to vote to raise taxes or not to vote to cut medicare, but you got to stop the pain." >> reporter: how bad could the pain get? after the house voted down the tarp bailout, the s&p 500 fell more than 8%. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: for more on the fiscal cliff negotiations, susie spoke with a leading democrat a short while ago, senator kent conrad of north dakota. >> susie: senator can rad thank you for
in washington, d.c., which is working to monitor the situation on the ground. >> one horrific example involves the shelling and bombing of bread lines in cities like aleppo. syrian civilians come out to line up for bread at these bakeries. it's the only way they have of feeding their families. and when a large group of people gathers, a bomb lands or a shell lands. it's very hard to imagine that that's random. >> warner: one instance-- on august 21, a government helicopter opened fire on a breadline in an aleppo suburb, killing 21. >> they attack bakeries where they know people are going to be and get at the food supply of the population. they burn houses, dwellings for civilians. >> warner: jeffrey white, a defense fellow at the washington institute for near east policy, says the syrian government is waging a deliberate "scorched earth" strategy. >> it's trying to get at f.s.a. units that are embedded inside the population. where people are, the f.s.a. tends to be. so it is trying to strike at the f.s.a., cause some attrition on them. but it's also trying to punish the people, the civilians,
uncertainties in climate science." today at the washington, d.c., headquarters of the competitive enterprise institute, a free market think tank, you can see myron ebell's philosophy proudly displayed on the walls. >> they're all cei authors... what we're fighting is the expansion of government. and there are many pretexts for expanding government. >> hockenberry: opsing government action on climate change to defend american freedom is a perfect fit. >> we felt that if you concede the science is settled and there is a consensus, you cannot... the moral high ground has been ceded to the alarmists. >> hockenberry: so you had to go to work and break down this consensu >> yes. and we did it because we believed that the consensus was phony. we believed that the so-called global warming consensus was not based on science but was a political consensus, which included a number of scientists. >> hockenberry: in 2009, agreement on global warming seemed part of the solid wave of enthusiasm that elected barack obama. with the changing of the guard in washington, there was a bipartisan call to action, a
thanksgiving meals to needy families at homeless shelters across the country, like this one in washington, d.c. turkey and all the trimmings were also served to u.s. troops overseas at bases in afghanistan and kuwait. the british broadcasting corporation appointed a new director-general in the wake of its worst crisis in years. tony hall-- a former bbc news executive and currently the head of the royal opera house-- will replace george entwistle. entwistle resigned from the post earlier this month, amid a controversy stemming from the bbc's coverage of child sex abuse. >>reenivasan: next, reducing greece's big debt. the troubled country appears to be on track to get some much- needed aid next week. but european union leaders meeting at a summit this week are still unable to agree on how to cut greece's debt to a more sustainable level. "newshour" economics correspondent paul solman has a behind the scenes look at the efforts to do so. it's part of his ongoing reporting on "making sense of financial news." >> reporter: is the euro-crisis resolved? the message from europe's financial markets o
running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you. >> great to see you, bill. >> bob, what will you remember about this election? >> well, the first t
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